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Safe Harbour Agreement – Effects on SuccessFactors and SAP onPremise HR Systems?

4 Responses
  1. Oliver

    Hi, any US-Company is bound to the PATRIOT-Act allowing US LE access to data on the server of us-companies worldwide even if the local law didn’t allow it without any warrant etc. It can’t be changed by any private law contracts like some us-companies pretend. In my opinion any use of us cloud services to store personal data is prohibited now. The cloud business is dead. Maybe the german cloud created by microsoft at this time is a solution.

    1. Sven Ringling

      Hi Oliver,

      a fair comment to begin with, but imo the conclusion is a bit over the top.
      A) there is already new legislation in place to replace the Safe Harbour agreement
      B) There are substantial non-US cloud companies by now like SAP, who own SuccessFactors (if need be, it would be easy for SAP to move subsidiearies‘ head offices to Germany as well, or just make them sell their servers to SAP holding), Ariba, Concur, Fieldglass and run some own brand clouds like CRM cloud.

  2. Oliver

    Successfactors is a US company – so it doesn’t matter where they store the data. It’s illegal for european companies!

    1. Sven Ringling

      Hi Oliver,

      so, you are saying it’s legally not allowed for European companies to hold data at any servers owned by US companies? So, if personal data was involved (and there’s always some), no EU companies could use google docs, Office 365, Amazon Web Services, Microsoft Azure, Rackspace, Salesforce, Tripit, Dropbox, iCloud, gmail, hotmail, Skype,…

      Sounds like an immediate break down of the European economy.
      Do you have a reference to that legislation? If there is something that can be interpreted that way.

      SuccessFactors may actually be the exception, because it’s a subsidiary of a German company, so really shouldn’t count as US (unless you say, it’s the subsidiary that counts, but then again the European datacentres will be held by European subsidiaries of SuccessFactors – how ever you look at it , SuccessFactors is one of the few cloud solutions you could still use, if that was true ;-) )

      Or, do you conclude that because US companies have a tendency to break other countries laws, because it’s usually much easier for them to get away with it than the other way round? Sadly that’s true and may be reason to think twice before trusting a US vendor to stick to EU law, but I don’t think that make sit illegal for European firms to use US cloud vendors?

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